TESTIMONIALS

Footage documenting a resuscitation on a plane using the Pocket BVM. The patient was successfully resuscitated until arrival at the hospital.
http://ow.ly/iZ8f304B8hh

Resuscitation on a plane 2 January, 2015

Snakebite Medicine Specialist and Herpetology based in San Francisco, CA; periodically adventuring in West & East Africa
I am a herpetologist and wilderness medicine specialist.I have used this BVM in my field bag for wilderness/remote medicine applications for several years now.

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For the innovative design alone I would give this product 5 stars for use in adult patients and those who meet or exceed the manufacturer’s 88 lb minimum recommended body mass. This product solves the quandary of how to pack a BVM in a wilderness medical kit for extended duty in remote conditions, as traditional BVM’s would take up at least 4-6x the space of this device in its compact storage case. I carried this device in my pack for almost a year while working in West and East Africa, and had the unfortunate opportunity to use it on a number of occasions. If there is a chance that you will be using this device on infants or small pediatric patients, do not expect to achieve an effective seal by inversion of the mask to fit smaller faces. In my experience, it is simply not possible. Do yourself and your patients a favor, invest in a mask for infants and one for small children and ensure that they fit your BVM ahead of time – a number of pediatric masks in west African hospitals were incompatible with this BVM and couldn’t be attached. Note that in much of Africa, the concept of a one-time use BVM is completely ludicrous and I carried the same device for the entire trip. It was sterilized after each use just like everything else used there, and held up flawlessly under challenging conditions with no significant wear and tear evident. When used for appropriately sized patients, this device is truly a lifesaver and one I will not go without for remote medical assignments. I highly recommend it for such uses. Also, the anesthesiologist’s advice about the importance of adequate training and hands on experience for effective use of these devices is spot on. Do not mash the mask onto your patient’s face, lift the face into the mask, check your seal, and don’t forget to reassess. The air-filled cuff on traditional masks is replaced by a different design in this product to enable it to collapse and fit into such a small case; it is slightly more finicky to successfully seal than a standard air-cushioned mask so take the time to familiarize yourself with it before use and if you are resuscitating with a second rescuer special attention needs to be taken to ensure that this fact is not missed at the expense of the patient.

Jordan Benjamin Snakebite Medicine Specialist and Herpetology 20 June, 2014

When bag space is at a minimum, these BVMs do the trick. We have over 40 medical bags of various sizes and shapes, and having our BVMs in a hard case also protects from damage.

 

Jason Parrish Paramedic 16 October, 2013

I’m a paramedic for the past 36 years and go through a lot of gear. As times have changed, rigs have gone from big boxes to vans and space is a premium. I bought two of these so I could save some space in the first bags. I’ve used one already and it’s a great BVM. Add to that the fact that it stores in half the space and it’s worth every penny.

Jeffrey Campbell Paramedic 14 May, 2013

I was surprised at how compact it was! It appears to be very sturdy despite all the folding. Very satisfied.

 

Chris Hungon 21 January, 2013

This is a nice BVM & wonderfully compact. It fits nicely even in a medium sized first aid kit. Great if you’re in the field & advanced help is not at hand.

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2 things to be aware of:
1. It’s tricky to get it back in the case. Not an issue if you use it, since you would throw it away, but if you examine it decide if you want more on hand…
2. I am an anesthesiologist & use bag valve masks every day, on real patients. You need training and familiarity to use them properly. Lift the patient’s face into the mask, don’t just mash the mask down onto their face.

Dr. Stensurd Anesthesiologist 18 October, 2012

The Los Gatos-Monte Sereno Disaster Aid Response Team performs search and rescue work in the coastal mountains of California, frequently well away from immediate EMS support from fire departments and ambulances.  When we have a patient care situation,

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it is likely that there will be a considerable delay before EMS support will arrive.  Foot, bicycle and AVT field teams can’t carry full-size BVMs due to space constraints, and we have been left with the limitations of the CPR rescue mask.  Rescue masks are certainly light and small, but are tiring to use for even moderate periods of time and thus risk the quality of patient care.

The Pocket BVM greatly improves the in-field quality of medical support provided by our teams:  while still light and compact, the Pocket BVM is capable of efficient operation for extended periods.  Little more space is required than that for a rescue mask and the Pocket BVM fits easily in all the packs in use by our teams.  Our volunteer EMTs have tested and approved the Pocket BVM for use by our teams, and will include Pocket BVM usage in our team-wide CPR training updates.

The Pocket BVM meets all our operational needs:  compact to carry, quick to deploy and effective to use.  It’s a serious product for serious applications.

Dana Timbrook Secretary, Board of Directors Los Gatos-Monte Sereno Disaster Aid Response Team 31 October, 2011

To whom it may Concern:

This letter is being written in recommendation of the Micro BVM Ambu.  I recently had occasion to use this device and highly recommend its portability, efficiency and sturdiness.

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We used the device for over 2 hours during a complex aero medical evacuation of an unstable patient.  Needless to say, equipment durability is paramount during such circumstances- and the Micro BVM Ambu stood the test.

I highly recommend the device.  Should you wish to contact me for further information- please feel free to do so.

Zev Wimpfheimer MD FACEP Department of Emergency Medicine Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem 24 March, 2010